‎"...a little 'trouty', but quite good" ~ Eve Kendall, North By Northwest

Wednesday, October 31, 2007

seal snouts

I got this email the other day:
I happened by your blog this evening - after my wife and children and I ate sandwiches at the beach watching the sun set.

I was horrified to notice that, after being such a humongous influence in your life, you make no mention of me. No retelling of my beguiling stories, no quotes of my deep insights into my alternate realities, nada, nil, nothing!

After I spent hours ranting about this puzzling omission, (my wife) mentioned that it could be because of a comment I may have made along the lines of " you're not going to put this in your BLOG are you?"

I was only joking. I/we LOVE attention, good, bad, neutral, any attention. Much like a bad dog that poops on your new couch cushions, any attention, be it a thrown high heel shoe or coddling praise for making it outside, any attention is good attention.
Just sayin is all.

"You're not going to put this in your blog" referred to a rural legend that the town used to pay $1 per seal snout - to keep the population down. Ew.

Rest assured that I will consider this friend and his alternate realities Open Season in the future. I will not, however, be inviting him into my home (especially anywhere near my couch) anytime soon.

2 comments:

sir stink of fish said...

The seal snout thing is not a "rural legend". The history books tell us of efforts in the 1900s to control seal populations where a reward was offered at town hall for killing seals. Just the snout was enough proof, you know, like the witch's broom.
Unfortunately, google is as uninformed as some bloggers and could not get my back on this one.
Check the local museum if you have the time.

Susan said...

Stinky - I think it was mentioned that I should verify it at the time of the original conversation. But if I were not so lazy, I would be an actual journalist, now wouldn't I?

Besides, I liked using the term Rural Legend (we live in the sticks, not like you Urban Legend city folk).